How to Store and Handle Miscellaneous Dangerous Goods: A Complete Guide

Feb 19, 2021 Posted by Walter Ingles

In Australia, Class 9 Miscellaneous Dangerous Goods, according to the current ADG Code, are substances and articles which, when transported, present a danger or hazard not covered by the other eight classes.

Miscellaneous dangerous substances and articles can include:

  • Environmentally hazardous substances not covered by other classes
  • Substances transported at elevated temperatures (≥ 100°C in liquid state or ≥ 240°C in solid-state)
  • Genetically modified organisms (GMOs)

Globally, all miscellaneous dangerous goods and articles are classified by the UN Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods: Model Regulations - Twenty-first Revised Edition (2019).

The ADG Code - formally known as the Australian Code for the Transport of Dangerous Goods by Road & Rail - aligns with the UN Model Regulations and also includes specific provisions that better reflect current Australian practices and conditions.

This post provides a complete guide to the safe handling and storage of Class 9 Miscellaneous Dangerous Goods for any workplace in Australia.

Miscellaneous Dangerous Goods in the Workplace

A wide variety of dangerous goods and articles of Class 9 are stored and handled in workplaces across Australia.

Some common examples of Class 9 dangerous goods in Australia include:

  • Airbag inflators and airbag modules
  • Ammonium nitrate fertilisers
  • Asbestos products (Blue, Brown or White)
  • Battery-powered equipment
  • Dry ice (solid carbon dioxide)
  • First aid kits
  • Fish meal
  • Lithium batteries

How Class 9 Miscellaneous Dangerous Goods are Subdivided

The ADG Code assigns all transportable substances (including mixtures and solutions) and articles to one of nine classes according to the main hazard they present. Some classes, including Class 9, are subdivided into several distinct divisions.

Note that the numerical order of the classes and divisions does not reflect the degree of danger.

Some dangerous goods are also assigned to one of the three UN Packing Groups in accordance with the degree of danger they present.

  • Packing Group I: Substances presenting high danger
  • Packing Group II: Substances presenting medium danger
  • Packing Group III: Substances presenting low danger

Class 9 miscellaneous dangerous substances, including environmentally hazardous substances, are assigned to either Packing Group II or III (with the exception of some chemical and first aid kits).

Note that articles are not assigned to packing groups. Specific packaging requirements are set out in the applicable packing instructions.

Class 9 Substances and Articles Subdivisions

Proper Shipping Name UN No. Packing Gp
Substances which, on inhalation as fine dust, may endanger health
BLUE ASBESTOS (crocidolite)
BROWN ASBESTOS (amosite, mysorite)
AMPHIBOLE (actinolite, anthophyllite, tremolite)
2212 II
WHITE ASBESTOS (chrysotile) 2590 III
Substances evolving flammable vapour
POLYMERIC BEADS, EXPANDABLE 2211 III
PLASTICS MOULDING COMPOUND in dough, sheet or extruded rope form 3314 III
Lithium batteries
LITHIUM METAL BATTERIES e.g., rechargeable (lithium alloy) batteries 3090 II
LITHIUM METAL BATTERIES CONTAINED IN / PACKED WITH EQUIPMENT e.g., laptops, phones, cameras, power tools 3091 II
LITHIUM ION BATTERIES e.g., rechargeable (lithium ion polymer) batteries 3480  
LITHIUM ION BATTERIES CONTAINED IN / PACKED WITH EQUIPMENT 3481  
LITHIUM BATTERIES INSTALLED IN CARGO TRANSPORT UNIT e.g., lithium battery-powered vehicles 3536  
Capacitors
CAPACITOR, ELECTRIC DOUBLE LAYER with energy storage capacity > 0.3 Wh 3499  
CAPACITOR, ASYMMETRIC with energy storage capacity > 0.3 Wh 3508  
Life-saving appliances
LIFE-SAVING APPLIANCES, SELF-INFLATING 2990 --
LIFE-SAVING APPLIANCES, NOT SELF-INFLATING containing dangerous goods as equipment 3072 --
SAFETY DEVICES electrically initiated 3268 III
Substances and articles which, in the event of fire, may form dioxins
Examples include transformers, condensers and apparatus containing the following substances:
POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS, LIQUID 2315 II
POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS, SOLID 3432 II
POLYHALOGENATED BIPHENYLS, LIQUID
HALOGENATED MONOMETHYLDIPHENYLMETHANES, LIQUID
POLYHALOGENATED TERPHENYLS, LIQUID
3151 II
POLYHALOGENATED BIPHENYLS, SOLID
HALOGENATED MONOMETHYLDIPHENYLMETHANES, SOLID
POLYHALOGENATED TERPHENYLS, SOLID
3152 II
Substances transported or offered for transport at elevated temperatures
ELEVATED TEMPERATURE LIQUID, N.O.S. ≥ 100°C and < its flash-point - including molten metal, molten salts, etc. 3257 III
ELEVATED TEMPERATURE SOLID, N.O.S., ≥ 240°C 3258 III
Environmentally hazardous substances
Substances and mixtures dangerous to the aquatic environment and not classified elsewhere in Class 9
ENVIRONMENTALLY HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCE, SOLID, N.O.S. 3077 III
ENVIRONMENTALLY HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCE, LIQUID, N.O.S. 3082 III
Genetically modified micro-organisms (GMMOs) and genetically modified organisms (GMOs)
GMMOs or GMOs are not subject to the ADG Code when licensed by the OGTR, approved by FSANZ, or exempt from such licences and approvals under the Gene Technology Act 2000
GENETICALLY MODIFIED MICRO-ORGANISMS
GENETICALLY MODIFIED ORGANISMS
3245 --
Ammonium nitrate-based fertilisers
AMMONIUM NITRATE-BASED FERTILISERS, SOLID 2071 III
Other substances or articles
Other substances or articles presenting a danger during transport, but not meeting the definitions of another class
ACETALDEHYDE AMMONIA 1841 III
CARBON DIOXIDE, SOLID (DRY ICE) 1845 III
ZINC DITHIONITE (ZINC HYDROSULPHITE) 1931 III
DIBROMODIFLUOROMETHANE (Fire extinguisher agent) 1941 III
BENZALDEHYDE (Bitter almond oil) 1990 III
FISH MEAL (FISH SCRAP), STABILISED 2216 III
MAGNETISED MATERIAL 2807 III
CASTOR BEANS, MEAL, POMACE, FLAKE 2969 III
VEHICLE, FLAMMABLE GAS POWERED or FLAMMABLE LIQUID POWERED
VEHICLE, FUEL CELL, FLAMMABLE GAS POWERED or FLAMMABLE LIQUID POWERED
3166 --
BATTERY-POWERED VEHICLE or BATTERY-POWERED EQUIPMENT 3171 --
CHEMICAL KIT (silver nitrate solution) or FIRST AID KIT 3316 I, II or III
AVIATION REGULATED LIQUID, N.O.S. 3334 --
AVIATION REGULATED SOLID, N.O.S. 3335 --
FUMIGATED CARGO TRANSPORT UNIT 3359  
DANGEROUS GOODS IN ARTICLES, MACHINERY, APPARATUS 3363  
PACKAGINGS DISCARDED, EMPTY, UNCLEANED 3509  
ENGINE, INTERNAL COMBUSTION< br> MACHINERY, INTERNAL COMBUSTION 3530  
ARTICLES CONTAINING MISCELLANEOUS DANGEROUS GOODS N.O.S. 3548  

Note: N.O.S. denotes Not Otherwise Specified

Australian Standard for Storage and Handling of Miscellaneous Dangerous Goods

Standards Australia developed and maintain a Standard that sets out the requirements and recommendations for the safe storage and handling of dangerous goods and articles of Class 9, as classified by the UN Model Recommendations and listed in the ADG Code

This Standard, AS/NZS 4681:2000 The storage and handling of Class 9 (miscellaneous) dangerous goods and articles (AS 4681), covers these goods as transported in packages, intermediate bulk containers (IBCs) and bulk.

The Standard provides guidelines for:

  • Minor storage of Class 9 Miscellaneous Dangerous Goods
  • Bulk storage and handling of Class 9 Miscellaneous Dangerous Goods
  • Location, design and construction of stores
  • Fire protection
  • Waste disposal
  • Operations
  • Personnel safety
  • Emergency procedures

Class 9 - Miscellaneous Dangerous Goods Label

The warning label or placard used to identify Class 9 Dangerous Goods typically has seven black vertical stripes on a white background in the upper half of the label, with the figure 9 underlined in the bottom corner.

miselenous-image1

 

 Class 9 - Miscellaneous Dangerous Goods signage label. Source: National Transport Commission

Variations of the Miscellaneous Dangerous Goods label feature additional environmentally hazardous substance marks such as lithium batteries and dead fish.

miselenou-2-imagemissenleous-3image-iocn

Variations of Class 9 - Miscellaneous Dangerous Goods signage labels. Source: National Transport Commission

Miscellaneous Dangerous Goods Not Covered by AS 4681

The following scenarios involving dangerous goods are not covered by the standard:

  • The transport of Class 9 dangerous goods and articles covered by other regulations, rules and codes, such as the ADG Code
  • The storage and handling of bitumen, which is covered by AS 1940
  • The storage and handling of Class 9 dangerous goods and articles which are regulated only for air transport, including aviation-regulated liquids and solids
  • Genetically modified micro-organisms (GMMOs)
  • The handling of Class 9 dangerous goods and articles in Australian ports, which is covered by AS 3846
  • The storage and handling of Class 9 dangerous goods (not intended for resale) on farms, which are covered by AS 2507
  • Class 9 dangerous goods that are combustible liquids at quantities classified as more than minor storage, which are covered by AS 1940

Risks Associated With Miscellaneous Dangerous Goods

Dangerous goods, by their very definition, present a particular degree of risk to people, property and the environment due to their physical and chemical properties.

The level of risk and type of reaction associated with dangerous and hazardous substances and materials varies according to the Class and unique properties of the substance or material. Factors such as the quantity of the substance, its location and the properties of other nearby materials also need to be considered when evaluating the level of risk associated with the storage, handling and transport of dangerous goods.

How to Safely Store Class 9 Miscellaneous Dangerous Goods

If you regularly use or store dangerous goods in your workplace, it is vitally important that you store, handle and manage these materials in a manner that minimises the associated risks they present to people, property and the surrounding environment.

An example protocol may involve the following steps:

  • Identify the relevant Dangerous Goods (DG) classification of the substance or article using resources such as the Class 9 Subdivisions table above, the ADG Code and the Australian Standards applicable to dangerous goods.
  • Assess the quantity, location and storage facility to be used for the material:
    • Does it qualify as minor storage or bulk?
    • What are the design and construction attributes of the packing stores and how are they maintained?
  • Refer to the applicable sections of the relevant standard - e.g., AS 4681 - to ensure you implement the right controls and adhere to the general safety requirements that will mitigate the specific risks and hazards associated with the dangerous goods in your workplace, including:
    • Keeping dangerous goods and articles away from heat and potential ignition sources
    • Ensuring packages are secure, marked appropriately and not prone to spillage
    • Maintaining suitable waste disposal procedures
    • Regularly inspecting the goods using suitably trained personnel
    • Providing adequate training to personnel involved in the storage and handling of the dangerous goods
    • Segregating incompatible dangerous goods
    • Providing and maintaining appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) appropriate to the operational requirements of the store
    • Providing and maintaining first aid kits
    • Meeting any special requirements for the storage and handling of specific types of dangerous goods, such as asbestos, ammonium nitrate fertilisers, lithium batteries and other environmentally hazardous substances covered by the Standard

Requirements for Minor Storage of Class 9 Dangerous Goods

The Australian Standard for the storage and handling of Class 9 (miscellaneous) dangerous goods and articles (AS 4681) outlines the criteria for classification as minor storage as well as the general storage conditions and special storage conditions for specific dangerous goods, including:

  • Equipment containing explosives and pyrotechnic devices
  • Elevated temperature liquids and solids
  • Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and asbestos
  • Dry ice (solid carbon dioxide)
  • Ammonium nitrate fertiliser
  • Polymeric beads and plastics moulding material

An example of a safe and compliant Class 9 storage is shown below:

desk-image-1

 

Class 9 Miscellaneous Dangerous Goods minor storage cabinet

Requirements for Location, Design and Construction of DG Package Stores

The Standard (AS 4681) also sets out the requirements and recommendations for the location, design and construction of package stores for Class 9 dangerous goods and articles, including Class 9 Miscellaneous Dangerous Goods storage cabinets.

Criteria are provided for:

  • The types of stores, e.g., room, enclosure, cabinet or building
  • Separation distances to boundaries and protected places
  • Design and construction - including lighting, ventilation, spillage containment, safety showers and eyewash stations, outdoor storage areas, and offices within a store

funnel-image-1

The installation of a safety shower and eyewash station should be considered where packages are opened or goods are transferred

Watch the following brief video for an example of a safety shower and eyewash station installation.

Requirements for Bulk Storage and Handling of Class 9 DG

The Standard (AS 4681) stipulates that the storage of Class 9 dangerous goods in bulk quantities must be in a container that fits the following criteria:

  • A portable bulk container:
    • An intermediate bulk container (IBC)
    • A tank container complying with the requirements of the ADG Code / IMDG Code
    • An approved demountable tank complying with the requirements of AS 2809.1 and AS 2809.4
  • A fixed bulk container - a permanently positioned tank, hopper or silo that is filled and discharged in situ

Requirements and recommendations are also outlined for the design and construction, location and filling of bulk containers, as well as the requirements for bunds and compounds.

>> Ask an expert about a custom dangerous goods bulk storage solution for your workplace

Emergency Management of Miscellaneous Dangerous Goods

Managing emergencies in the workplace requires adequate planning for emergencies, the maintenance of manifests, placarding, and a process for the management of spills and leaks

How to Store a Manifest

A manifest is a written summary of hazardous chemicals that are handled or stored at a workplace. The Standard for the storage and handling of Class 9 (miscellaneous) dangerous goods and articles (AS 4681) specifies that a manifest must be provided and maintained, and kept in a location known to the local fire brigade.

According to WHS regulation, it’s recommended that the manifest be kept in a red waterproof Hazmat Box and stored somewhere readily accessible to emergency responders.

Hazmat Boxes are specifically built for securing important emergency information, including the manifest of hazardous chemicals, safety data sheets (SDSs) and site emergency plans.

red-product

 

Manifest and Emergency Information Cabinet

Placarding for Class 9 Miscellaneous Dangerous Goods

The Standard (AS 4681) stipulates that stores in which Class 9 dangerous goods and articles are kept must be placarded so the signage reflects the actual storage situation at any given time. If the storage situation changes, the placarding should be amended without delay.

The following signage must be displayed to meet regulatory requirements:

danger-image

 

No Smoking No Ignition Source sign

Managing Leaks and Spills of Class 9 Dangerous Goods

The Standard (AS 4681) highlights the importance of preventing leaks and spills in the workplace, and ensuring the immediate control and clean-up of leaks and spills if and when they occur, or at least as soon as they are detected.

Providing spill kits and maintaining secure, purpose-built storage facilities and containers for all dangerous goods is the most effective way to manage spills and leaks when they occur.

CHHW2 - PSRKH240

 

Oil and fuel spill kit

Bunding is an efficient and effective solution for handling, containing and decanting dangerous goods.

Bunding products such as spill containment pallets, IBC suitable bunds, poly drum handling items, portable bunds, bunded shelving, drip trays and floor bunding, all serve to mitigate against the risk of leaks and spills by safely containing any that occur.

Bunding products should conform to the Australian Standards and dangerous goods regulations in order to reduce your risk of financial liability due to non-compliance.

car-image

 

Polyethylene spill containment caddy

Next Steps

Dangerous goods storage specialists STOREMASTA can help you with everything from dangerous goods storage solutions, a compliance audit and risk assessment, and even virtual dangerous goods training for your personnel.

STOREMASTA have also developed an eBook which explains how to use the Hierarchy of Controls to control the risks associated with dangerous goods, including hazardous chemicals.

This free eBook helps you select the most effective risk control measures and implement all the required mandatory controls according to the current legislation.

Controlling-risks-associated-with-hazardous-chemicals_1

Walter Ingles

Walter Ingles Compliance Specialist

Walter is STOREMASTA’s Dangerous Goods Storage Specialist. He helps organisations reduce risk and improve efficiencies in the storage and management of dangerous goods and hazardous chemicals.

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